Getting on with it!

YOUR JOURNEY THROUGH LABOUR

This is the third of four posts that will follow your journey through labour. Labour tends to move through these four stages fluidly; there are no sudden breaks or stops between phases. 

Getting on with it – towards transition

‘As labour draws towards the second stage, an extraordinary change takes place.  The woman relaxes and often dozes off to sleep between the contractions.  The contractions slow down to all this ‘rest and be thankyou’ phase to occur.

(Caroline Flint, Midwife)

Caroline discusses how a woman’s labour sometimes comes to a brief halt as there is a lull in surges as her body re-coups before birth happens.  This is often a sign that birth is imminent. 

Clinically

The phase prior to pushing where the cervix has opened around the baby’s head, just before the urge to push is felt.  The baby drops through the cervix into the pelvis and expulsive contractions begin. 

What is happening

So once your body is really Getting on with it your body may have an intense period of surges whilst the remaining cervix dilates as the baby continues to move downwards.  This is often followed by a short phase where everything slows down for a while. It is the phase prior to pushing once the cervix has opened fully.  The baby drops through the cervix into the pelvis.  Some mothers feel sick and others will have an intense period where they feel panicky.

What it feels like

As the surges build up in both frequency and intensity many mothers feel panicky, and have an urgent urge to leave the building.  Some mothers feel sick, others have an urgent need to use the bathroom.  You may feel sleepy for a while, whilst your body is building itself up for birth.

What should I do?

This is definitely a time to go with the flow, do what your body is telling you to do.  Use your breathing to concentrate on the surges when they come and make full use of your birthing partner and Midwifery support.  Keep doing what you have been doing, concentrate on your breathing techniques. Over a period of time surges will change and you will start to feel pressure.  Just go with what you are feeling. Adopt upright positions and move around as your body is telling you to.  Now is the time to get into the birthing pool, if you haven’t already.  Let your birth supporters support you.  Listen to their calming words.

But what if?

Your midwife will continue to monitor both you and your baby and will start to listen to the baby’s heartbeat a bit more frequently.  She will keep the Sister in Charge of delivery updated and will arrange for obstetric support if it is needed.   

What now?

Hypnobirthing is a tried and tested way of helping you reduce anxiety and get into the right headspace to labour without fear.  The Calm Births course will show you how to relax into your labour both physically and emotionally.  If you would a copy of my free 7 frequently asked questions booklet please click here do just drop me an email or to book on to one of my classes click [here]

Published by Medway Hypnobirth

My name is Gill and I am the founder of Medway Hypnobirth. I am a former Midwife with over 10 years experience in antenatal, labour and postnatal care. I have a passion for birth and hope to share my passion for birth with you. I have 3 grown up children (the first of whom followed a long journey of infertility and IVF) who were all born in hospital. I followed my birthing plan which literally stated that I wanted a 'homebirth in hospital'. Throughout my Midwifery journey, I have been present at a fair few homebirths and seen many more babies birthed in hospital and in theatre. Birth follows its own course and I have seen hypnobirth techniques helping many women stay in control of their birth however it happens. After thoroughly researching different hypnobirthing schools, I settled on Calm Birth training as a calm birth is what we all want to happen. I hope that a Hypnobirth with me will aid your personal journey to a calm birth too and I am really looking forward to meeting you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: